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Upcoming Panel on Executive Power:

This Thursday, I will be on a panel on executive power at the upcoming Federalist Society 10th Annual Faculty Conference in New York City. The other panelists will be Harvard political theorist Harvey Mansfield, Sandy Levinson of the University of Texas (and the Balkinization blog), and my George Mason colleague Neomi Rao. I anticipate that, on this issue, I will have more points of agreement with Sandy than with Neomi and Professor Mansfield, which is an interesting role reversal. Some of my reservations about unfettered wartime executive power are discussed in this post.

As usual, the Fed Soc conference scheduled to coincide with the annual AALS conference. This panel will be held at 6:30 PM at the Parker Meridien Hotel, 118 W. 57th St., in the Tansa Room.

Related Posts (on one page):

  1. Panel on Post-Kelo Eminent Domain Reform:
  2. Upcoming Panel on Executive Power:
2 Comments
Panel on Post-Kelo Eminent Domain Reform:

As part of this year's 10th Annual Federalist Society Faculty Conference in New York City, I have organized a panel on post-Kelo eminent domain reform. The panel will be held on Friday at 9:00-10:45 AM, in the Tansa Room of the Parker Meridien Hotel (118 W. 57th St.). Participants include prominent eminent domain scholars such as James Ely (Vanderbilt), David Dana (Northwestern), Daniel Kelly (a visiting fellow at Yale), and my colleague Steve Eagle. I'm not going to be officially participating myself, but will be present as the panel organizer. The participants' papers, along with contributions by Richard Epstein and Andrew Morriss, will be published in an upcoming symposium in the Supreme Court Economic Review, edited by co-blogger Todd Zywicki and myself.

As I discuss in more detail in this paper, over 40 states, as well as the federal government, have passed eminent domain reform laws since the Supreme Court decided Kelo v. City of New London. There has been more legislative reaction against Kelo than any other Supreme Court decision of at least the last 35 years. So if you're going to be at the AALS conference and have an interest in property law, eminent domain, or the political impact of Supreme Court decisions, try not to miss this panel. I hope to see you there.

Related Posts (on one page):

  1. Panel on Post-Kelo Eminent Domain Reform:
  2. Upcoming Panel on Executive Power:
7 Comments