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Eason Jordan Quits,

The Corner (National Review Online) reports, pointing to an AP story that says:

CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan quit Friday amidst a furor over remarks he made in Switzerland last month about journalists killed by the U.S. military in Iraq.

Jordan said he was quitting to avoid CNN being "unfairly tarnished" by the controversy. . . .

If you haven't been following the story, go to InstaPundit, search for Eason, and look at each of the post — Glenn Reynolds has been one of the people who has helped keep the story alive.

This looks like a classic example of the power of blogging: Though many of Jordan's critics have been politicians and journalists, as best I can tell the mainstream media initially paid little attention to the story. In an earlier era, it might have died from lack of attention, if it weren't for the bloggers' talking about the story, and making it hard for people to ignore.

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  1. Barney Frank & Eason Jordan:
  2. Eason Jordan Quits,
Barney Frank & Eason Jordan: I think Kaus has it right:
It should also be noted that the controversy was kept alive not just by blogs, but by the refusal of a relatively liberal Democrat, Barney Frank, to sweep it under the rug in gentlemanly fashion.
Even more, Frank's calling Jordan on the spot while on the same panel was a crucial part of the story. Very honorable behavior all around.


Related Posts (on one page):

  1. Barney Frank & Eason Jordan:
  2. Eason Jordan Quits,