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Dvandvas:

I should just make clear that, while zeugmas are to be avoided, dvandvas are just fine.

Spartacus (www):
RE the definition cited, is "Anglo-Saxon" really a dvandva, or are Anglo-Saxons to be distinguished from continental Saxons, or Saxons of other stripes? That would seem to make Ango subordinate to Saxon (linguistically, not historically), and thus not a true dvandva.
11.7.2008 5:02pm
Glenn W. Bowen (mail):
Zippity-zeugmahhhhhhhhhhhhhhh,

Zippity-ayyyyyyy!

My-oh-my what a dvandvaful day!


is "Anglo-Saxon" really a dvandva, or are Anglo-Saxons to be distinguished from continental Saxons, or Saxons of other stripes?


Distinguished, why, yes. Obviously, the Anglo-Saxons had a little dash, lacking in there lethargic continental counterparts.
11.7.2008 6:24pm
Norman Bates (mail):
Twenty extra points to the student who can point out the linguistic relation of zeugma and yoga.
11.7.2008 9:34pm
Malvolio:
Twenty extra points to the student who can point out the linguistic relation of zeugma and yoga.
They are both ultimately from the PIE word for "yoke".

The same connection can be made between "phallus" and "blow" (the root means "inflate"), which is much funnier, imho.
11.7.2008 10:08pm
Hoosier:
For the Snark /was/ a Boojum you see.
11.7.2008 11:39pm
Paul Milligan (mail):
And, by purest coincidencce I'm sure, the headline of the blog entry immediately below this thread is

"Not Everything Law Professors Say Is Interesting"

:-)
11.8.2008 12:03am
CrimsonTribe:

RE the definition cited, is "Anglo-Saxon" really a dvandva, or are Anglo-Saxons to be distinguished from continental Saxons, or Saxons of other stripes? That would seem to make Ango subordinate to Saxon (linguistically, not historically), and thus not a true dvandva.


IIRC, Anglo-Saxon doe not refer to the English branch of the Saxons, but instead to a new group made up of the Angles, Saxons and other Germanic peoples who settled in England.
11.8.2008 5:40am
Sean O'Hara (mail) (www):

The same connection can be made between "phallus" and "blow" (the root means "inflate"), which is much funnier, imho.


And yet phallic and cephalic are entirely unrelated.
11.8.2008 11:42pm
einhverfr (mail) (www):
Malvolio wrote:

They are both ultimately from the PIE word for "yoke".

The same connection can be made between "phallus" and "blow" (the root means "inflate"), which is much funnier, imho.


Another one that might also be a dvandva:

courtyard (court and yard coming from the same root).
11.9.2008 6:55pm
einhverfr (mail) (www):
Some of us spend too much time reading linguistics, philology, and etymology textbooks :-P
11.9.2008 6:56pm