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Max Rosenn:
Judge Max Rosenn, a Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit since 1970, passed away today at the age of 96. Judge Rosenn was a terrific judge, and remained strong until the end; a quick check on Westlaw suggests that Judge Rosenn's last opinions were issued just over a week ago.

  Interestingly, Judge Rosenn is not the only Third Circuit judge from Eastern Pennsylvania to pass away on February 7th in his mid 90s while still very much active in the work of the Third Circuit. The legendary Judge Albert Maris passed away on February 7, 1989, at the age of 95, a day after issuing a published opinion in a civil rights suit against a prison guard.

  Thanks to Howard for the link.
Justin (mail):
In somewhat related news, US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit Judge Daniel M. Friedman turns 90 tomorrow.

My heartfelt wishes to the family of Judge Rosenn, and congradulations to Judge Friedman.
2.7.2006 6:53pm
James Grimmelmann (mail) (www):
The Third Circuit's main courtroom in Philadelphia is named after Judge Maris. For the interested, the waiting area outside contains a small but quite well-curated exhibit on Maris's remarkably long and distinguished career.
2.7.2006 6:58pm
Cornellian (mail):
I wonder whether lifetime tenure (versus mandatory retirement) produces more of these "sharp and productive into their 90's" cases than "really should have retired years ago but refuses" cases.

I wonder what it would be like to appear in front of a 90 year old judge. The guy would remember the Depression, have been a fully grown adult at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor and studied law while the Supreme Court was still in the Lochner era (if one considers that era to have ended with West Coast Hotel in 1937). Someone who has lived through all the tremendous changes in American law society from the 1920's to today must have quite a perspective on law and on life.

I suppose I'm just saying I'd like to have a really, really long lunch with such a judge. That would be one great conversation.
2.7.2006 8:03pm
Eric Muller (www):
I argued a case before Judge Rosenn in the early 90s. It was one of the most pleasant arguments I've ever had. Judge Rosenn was a delightful man with a very distinguished career. Thanks for mentioning his passing, Orin.
2.7.2006 8:46pm
Dave Hardy (mail) (www):
I wonder what it would be like to appear in front of a 90 year old judge. The guy would remember the Depression, have been a fully grown adult at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor and studied law while the Supreme Court was still in the Lochner era

If he had lived to today, my late father in law would be 94. He had dated the woman who later became Mrs. Elliot Ness, studied overseas in fascist Italy, once translated a conversation between a nazi and an italian fascist over whether the former could get into a rally to hear his fuhrer speak, fought in WWII... he was conservative and could still remember the FDR jokes ("the problem with the Roosevelt stamp is ... I keep spitting on the wrong side!")

My own father would be 87 -- he started out in a dirt-floored abobe cabin where the interior walls were blankets hung from the ceiling and laundry was boiled in a tub outside. One night saw the Hindenberg fly over. Enlisted in 1940, hoping for assignment to an air base in Hawaii. On 12/7/1941 he stopped complaining that the recruit sgt had lied.
2.7.2006 10:55pm
AK (mail):
"Interestingly, Judge Rosenn is not the only Third Circuit judge from Eastern Pennsylvania to pass away on February 7th in his mid 90s while still very much active in the work of the Third Circuit."

Actually, that's incorrect. It isn't the slightest bit interesting.

Worst. Trivia. Ever.
2.8.2006 12:05pm
Hans J G Onderwater (mail):
I would like to express my deepest respect in remembering Judge Max Rosenn. My wife Marjoan and I were priviliged to have lunch and dinner with him when we visited his brother Harold Rosenn in Wilkles Barre. We were deeply impressed by the Judge's knowledge of the law and his deep understanding of justice. He was a great man and a great lawyer. Besides he was a most entertaining man with great knowledge of virtually everything, how trivial and how important it was. We will remember him with great affection.
Hans and Marjoan Onderwater
The Netherlands
2.11.2006 4:25pm