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Symposium on Neglected Supreme Court Justices:
Here, in the Vanderbilt Law Review. Because even Sherman Minton deserves a law review article once in a while. (Via CoOp)
Ex parte McCardle:
Thomas Todd finally gets his due as a giant of American jurisprudence!
3.31.2009 7:53pm
Dave N (mail):
But even this symposium overlooked Justice Joseph McKenna, who may have the distinction of being the only person ever to enroll in law school after being appointed to the Supreme Court.
3.31.2009 8:08pm
BRM:
Bushrod Washington is not neglected. He got a shout out in America: The Book.
3.31.2009 8:32pm
Anderson (mail):
There are lots of mediocre people, and they deserve to have an article about a mediocre Supreme Court justice too.
3.31.2009 10:16pm
krs:
Perhaps people are simply running out of ideas for academic articles...
3.31.2009 10:29pm
Dave N (mail):
Anderson,

True. Roman Hruska had a point.
3.31.2009 10:32pm
Anderson (mail):
Thx, Dave -- I can never remember the guy's name!
3.31.2009 11:59pm
Arnostocles:
Anderson,

Hruška [pronounced hrooshka] means "pear" in Czech.
There's also a pear brandy called hruškavice [hrooshkavitza]. It's pretty tasty booze.

I have no idea how, but maybe this will help you remember.
4.1.2009 12:17am
Sean M.:
Well, this should do wonders for Vanderbilt's cite count.

(Says a Law Review editor on a journal ranked slightly below Vanderbilt).
4.1.2009 1:13am
early bird (mail):
As a student at Minton's alma mater, Indiana Law, I'm personally thrilled that our only SC Justice is getting his, er, due. He's only, however, the third or fourth most illustrious graduate of this law school, behind Hoagy Carmichael, Wendell Willkie, and Birch Bayh. (Though some tell me Carmichael only attended the law school, but didn't graduate. I've been unable to confirm this.)
4.1.2009 8:47am
Anderson (mail):
our only SC Justice is getting his, er, due

Mississippi too has contributed only one justice, though with names enough for two: Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar.

It would be interesting to know which states have never had a justice on the Court. Alaska and Hawaii come first to mind, but I'm sure there are others.
4.1.2009 8:57am
Joseph Slater (mail):
Reminds me of this song from "The Simpsons":

We are the mediocre presidents.
You won't find our faces on dollars or on cents!
There's Taylor, there's Tyler,
There's Fillmore and there's Hayes.
There's William Henry Harrison;
Harrison:
I died in thirty days!
We...are...the...
Adequate, forgettable,
Occasionally regrettable
Caretaker presidents of the U-S-A
4.1.2009 9:44am
Steve2:
Well, the article on Minton certainly doesn't hesitate to make a strong statement about him, seeing as it boils down to "Sherman Minton was the justice with the strongest commitment to judicial restraint and ideological neutrality. Ever."

And Sean, as a Vanderbilt alum (though not of the law school), I'm thrilled to see our cite count go up one or two cites. And for us to do something that can get people to associate us with justices other than our actual one, who by most accounts was an absolutely dismal human being.
4.1.2009 9:52am
ASlyJD (mail):
University of Missouri-Kansas City LS has a rare distinction: we are one of only six law schools to have a SCOTUS justice and a POTUS attend.

Of course, Truman never graduated and Whittaker had a nervous breakdown after 18 months on the court, but hey! It's the only way we can be in a group of six with Harvard and Yale.
4.1.2009 9:57am
krs:
I suppose there will be some Supreme Court Justices who are still obscure and who didn't get articles in this symposium... thus making them really neglected.
4.1.2009 11:41am
Mark E.Butler (mail):
At first I thought this was an April Fool's Day joke.
4.1.2009 12:00pm
C. Gittings (mail) (www):
"It would be interesting to know which states have never had a justice on the Court."

Number of SC justices by state (based on a quick and dirty sort of Wikipedia's list, and counting C.J. Rehnquist for AZ):

NY 15
MA 9
OH 9
VA 8
PA 6
TN 6
KY 5
MD 5
NJ 5
CA 4
GA 4
IL 4
SC 4
AL 3
CT 3
AZ 2
IA 2
MI 2
MN 2
NC 2
NH 2
CO 1
IN 1
KS 1
LA 1
ME 1
MO 1
MS 1
TX 1
UT 1
WY 1
4.1.2009 12:04pm
Andrew Janssen (mail):
I'm not sure why Wikipedia's list counts Rehnquist as AZ/VA; he was born and raised in Wisconsin.
4.1.2009 12:46pm
dll111:

ASlyJD (mail):
University of Missouri-Kansas City LS has a rare distinction: we are one of only six law schools to have a SCOTUS justice and a POTUS attend.

Of course, Truman never graduated and Whittaker had a nervous breakdown after 18 months on the court, but hey! It's the only way we can be in a group of six with Harvard and Yale.
4.1.2009 9:57am


Ah, but Cincinnati has an even rarer distinction: it's the only law school to produce a President and Chief Justice there were the same person! Of course, Yale probably claims Taft for itself.
4.1.2009 1:00pm
Ex parte McCardle:
"Yale probably claims Taft for itself."

Of course it does. There's the extra, extra wide WHT seat in the upper balcony of Woolsey Hall.
4.1.2009 1:24pm
The Tub:

dll111:
Yale probably claims Taft for itself.


Don't worry, there's plenty to go around.
4.1.2009 1:32pm
ASlyJD (mail):
My 6'2" 350 lb. husband was recently depressed by this fact:

The "enormously fat" President Taft was 6'2", 350 lb.
4.1.2009 1:34pm
C. Gittings (mail) (www):
"I'm not sure why Wikipedia's list counts Rehnquist as AZ/VA; he was born and raised in Wisconsin."

Well it must be because Arizona was where he was in private practice and got involved with politics; Virgina because that was where he lived after he got involved in the federal government. I suspect it would be a tricky question for a lot of them if you looked at their bios in detail. Justice McKenna was a similar case, born in PA but began his legal career in California.
4.1.2009 1:48pm
markm (mail):
By C. Gittings count, only 31 states were home to even one SC Justice. Three of the first 14 states are missing: Rhode Island, Delaware, and Vermont. These are small states (43rd, 45th, and 49th in population), but Wyoming (last in population, became a state in 1890) claims one Justice. Of the three states with the shortest time in the union, AK claims 3 and AZ 2, but the much more populous HI isn't on the list. Of course, that might be a relic of past discrimination against the non-white majority.
4.4.2009 10:10am

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