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Congressman Kevorkian?

The AP reports that "Assisted-suicide advocate Jack Kevorkian plans to run for Congress, complicating a Michigan race that is expected to be among the most competitive in the nation."

Thanks to The Dilbert Blog for the pointer.

CheckEnclosed (mail):
Presumably, he supports term limits.
3.13.2008 3:26pm
Nathan_M (mail):
The real question is who will get a lower percentage of the popular vote, Kevorkian or Nader?
3.13.2008 3:27pm
Richard Aubrey (mail):
I wouldn't let him pour me coffee.
3.13.2008 3:47pm
Thales (mail) (www):
He would probably be the most ardent (if creepy) civil libertarian in the Michigan congressional delegation if elected. Not necessarily a bad thing. He was certainly a lawbreaker who took his punishment, but also a passionate advocate of what many view as the inalienable right to die in the manner one sees fit.
3.13.2008 4:02pm
Jim Rose (mail) (www):
The article says he is running as an independent. How about a ballot line for the "Right to Death"" party?
3.13.2008 4:15pm
dirc:
I understand that Dr. Kervorkian has some interesting solutions to the long-term funding problems of Medicare and Social Security.
3.13.2008 4:46pm
AnonymousPoster:
He is a felon, and still on parole - I'm really curious that he is allowed to run.
3.13.2008 6:01pm
gattsuru (mail) (www):
He is a felon, and still on parole - I'm really curious that he is allowed to run.


That's a purely state-to-state thing; there's no federal laws against it, same as felon voting. According to the Human Right's Watch, Michigan allows felons on parole, on probation, and they've served their time, to vote. Michigan links the right to run for public office with the right to vote, so as long as he's on probation he can run for office.

There are even state you can vote from in prison, although outside Kansas I'm doubtful any of them could be argued to allow a prisoner to run for office.
3.13.2008 6:26pm
Paul B:
Unlike most doctors running for office, I don't think he'll have too many of his patients voting for him
3.13.2008 6:32pm
ReaderY:
Solve social security, medicare, welfare, insurance rates, you name -- it's a wonder medical care is even legal, old, sick, and poor people cost so much to keep up. And what exactly are they doin for their keep? Why not get rid of the lot and save a buck? After all, what else in life is more important?
3.14.2008 1:57am
dew:
There are even state you can vote from in prison, although outside Kansas I'm doubtful any of them could be argued to allow a prisoner to run for office.

Early in his Massachusetts political career, James Michael Curley famously ran for and won an election for Boston alderman (city council) while in jail/prison for fraud. He was later elected mayor, to congress, and as governor, while managing to rack up a couple more corruption convictions in spare time.

I am not sure if that has changed since then, but I have never heard you cannot run for any office from jail here.
3.14.2008 12:12pm
kelvin mccabe:
AnonymousPoster:
I dont know other state laws on this - but in Chicago, there was a dustup last yr or so during the city council elections wherein people seeking alderman seats who had previous federal convictions for taking bribes as alderman were running again for their old seats. There is a state law that says convicted felons cannot run for alderman - but they could run for state congress or governor.

Equal protection challenge failed at the IL Sup Ct where they summarily reversed a lower court opinion that said this law had no rational basis (one could not be dog catcther or alderman if a felon, but could be state congressman, state senator,governor or state sup ct justice). The difference being the law itself said no convicted felon could run for an office created by the legislature - but COULD run for office created by the constitution itself. Nevermind the inherent bias that the legislature gets to excuse themselves from the requirement in writing the bill the way they did.

Rationally protecting the citizens of Illinois one dumb law at a time. Coincidentally, the challengers suggested that either all felons be restricted from elected office or no felons. That would at least be dumb 'equally.'
3.14.2008 4:46pm
DeezRightWingNutz:
Why did they let him out? Wasn't he sick and dying? Don't commit crimes that give you sentences beyond your life expectancy if you don't want to die in prison.
3.14.2008 11:08pm