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-Tion/-Sion Verbs That Aren't Also Nouns:

A puzzle from Michael Lorton:

Most words that end in -tion or -sion are nouns, but some are also verbs: consider mention, proposition, question, section, and station. What words that end in -tion or -sion are verbs but not nouns?

UPDATE: "Stunning, overwhelming thread victory."

jl08:
envision
3.11.2008 5:16pm
Michael Gray (mail):
impassion

Generally, the pre-fix "in", "en", "im" (to bring into, to enter) should lead to nounless verbs.
3.11.2008 5:18pm
SeaDrive:
the verb "sanction".
3.11.2008 5:22pm
Eugene Volokh (www):
SeaDrive: Sanction is a noun as well as a verb.
3.11.2008 5:25pm
Opus:
Decommission
3.11.2008 5:36pm
Daniel Chapman (mail):
You didn't say they couldn't ALSO be nouns... I was going to suggest "proposition"
3.11.2008 5:42pm
Connie:
Daniel: read the last line of his post.
3.11.2008 5:48pm
b.:
Daniel:

alternatively, read the title of the post. take note of the words "also," &"nouns," as well as the contraction "aren't."
3.11.2008 5:56pm
BA:
Daniel may also have benefited from reading the title of the post. Also, even if neither clue was there, the first sentence of the puzzle would have beat him to the punch: "proposition" is one of the examples Lorton has given.
3.11.2008 6:00pm
Suzy (mail):
Michael, I'm not sure why those prefixes should yield nounless verbs. What about things like incision, inversion, imprecision, etc?
3.11.2008 6:05pm
Suzy (mail):
Oh never mind... I see your point. It's not that they fail to be nouns, it's that when we begin with one as a verb, we'll generally make it a noun by adding a suffix.
3.11.2008 6:09pm
Frater Plotter:
"Proposition" isn't very much of a verb. The verb is "propose".
3.11.2008 6:22pm
Sasha Volokh (mail) (www):
Frater Plotter: Having done both, I can testify that these are two very different verbs.
3.11.2008 6:27pm
Waldensian (mail):
Stunning, overwhelming thread victory to Sasha. I almost blew Diet Coke through my nose when I read that.
3.11.2008 6:30pm
oledrunk (mail):
"Proposition" isn't very much of a verb. The verb is "propose".
"I propositioned her" differs from "I proposed to her".
3.11.2008 6:32pm
Erehwon (mail):
Having voted against many of them, I can attest to the fact that "proposition" can alse be used as a noun...
3.11.2008 6:44pm
fabnyny (mail):
decommission
3.11.2008 6:47pm
Mark Alonge (mail):
We only have three "verb only" -tion/-sion words so far:

decommission
envision
impassion

According to the OED, the first two are very new (1920s), and the third, impassion, is a borrowing from Italian impassionare, but a quite early one (16th cent.).

I have a hunch that it is not a coincidence that we have only come up with compound verbs that fall into this category.
3.11.2008 6:57pm
Glenn W. Bowen (mail):

Stunning, overwhelming thread victory to Sasha. I almost blew Diet Coke through my nose when I read that.


don't encourage him. he's... precocious.
3.11.2008 6:58pm
Syd Henderson (mail):
reposition
3.11.2008 7:19pm
jl08:
apportion
3.11.2008 7:42pm
GMUSL '07 Alum (mail):
reapportion
3.11.2008 8:05pm
Randy R. (mail):
Is 'action' a noun?
rendition
3.11.2008 8:18pm
Syd Henderson (mail):
rendition's also a noun.

recondition
3.11.2008 8:38pm
b.:
de-/re- partition
3.11.2008 8:45pm
sbw (mail) (www):
De man is a member of decommission. Noun.
3.11.2008 9:28pm
Skyler (mail) (www):
It seems to me that all of those examples given by Eugene are in fact nouns.

The beauty of English, among many other features, is that it is very flexible and nouns can be used as verbs.

I can give all sorts of other nouns that are also used as verbs.

Hammer
Type
Screw
Book
3.11.2008 9:34pm
Michael Gray (mail):
Actually, let me go back and reposition my initial hypothesis.

Here's the revised version that I envision:

The words we've uncovered on the thread so far seem as though they can be apportioned into one of two forms. First, one can take an existing noun/verb and add re- or de- (or un-) - though dictionaries will sometimes not recognize these as independent words. Even if the original word doubles as both noun and verb, the modified form is often solely a verb. Thus, "decommission", "reposition", etc.

Second, and perhaps more likely to impassion an etymologist, one can take a noun that does not double as a verb, and add an "active spirit" to it by using movement-oriented prefixes (in-/en-, ad-/a-, e-/ex-), and so recondition it to serve as a verb. "Apportion", "envision" and "impassion" are of this form.
3.11.2008 10:37pm
Shane (mail) (www):
Skyler: the examples are given in the following context (emphasis mine, especially on the word "also"):
Most words that end in -tion or -sion are nouns, but some are also verbs: consider mention, proposition, question, section, and station.

The unintentional humor in this thread is astounding.
3.11.2008 10:38pm
Skyler (mail) (www):
Okay, I read it backwards. Sorry.
3.11.2008 11:16pm