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Two Dozen Yale Law Students Stand With Plastic Bags Over Their Heads During Judge Bybee Talk:
Coverage from the Yale Daily News is here, and a photograph of the protest is here. Thanks to the ACS Blog for the links. (This happened a few days ago, but I don't think I've seen it widely blogged.)
Richard Aubrey (mail):
If they suffer brain damage from anoxia, will we be able to tell the difference?

Why is it that people who haven't graduated think themselves smarter than and superior to those who have?
2.7.2008 4:22pm
Ben P (mail):
I may strongly disagree with Bybee's position, but that's still pretty silly.

If he came here to talk, I would almost certainly go and listen, and hope I had the ability to ask some questions.
2.7.2008 4:24pm
Thorley Winston (mail) (www):
It could have been worse; at least they didn't try to replicate a naked human pyramid.
2.7.2008 4:25pm
EH (mail):
Richard,

It's nice to see anti-intellectualism is alive and well in the guise of those who think certification is the only form of intelligence.
2.7.2008 4:26pm
Anderson (mail):
If you can't put the plastic bag over Bybee's head, perhaps that's the next best choice.

Bybee is scum. I welcome any peaceful demonstration to that effect.
2.7.2008 4:27pm
Mark Field (mail):

Why is it that people who haven't graduated think themselves smarter than and superior to those who have?


Those of us who've graduated have had the chance to prove we're stupid. Those still in college are still waiting for that opportunity.
2.7.2008 4:27pm
Thief (mail) (www):

It could have been worse; at least they didn't try to replicate a naked human pyramid.


Their NEA grant didn't come through in time.

*rimshot*
2.7.2008 4:27pm
TerrencePhilip:
What a joke. Will they put bags over their heads when they get rulings they don't like in a court, too?
2.7.2008 4:28pm
Ex-Fed (mail) (www):
"Man from Glad! Man from Glad! College students need assistance with banal protest! Please hurry!"
2.7.2008 4:29pm
ejo:
yet, if a genocidal iranian psychopath gave a speech there, they would listen respectfully and not utter a peep.
2.7.2008 4:32pm
2Hard4U2C:
Obviously these clowns are unable to comprehend the line between the academic and the political. I would have turned on the fire sprinklers for some good old-fashioned waterboarding.

[Obviously that is just a joke.]
2.7.2008 4:33pm
Andrew Morton:
<blockquote>
when about 25 Yale Law School students in the audience stood up and sheathed their heads in black trash bags, in imitation of hooded military prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.
</blockquote>

<blockquote>
Jay Bybee, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit who, when he was head of the Bush administration's Office of Legal Counsel, signed off on a controversial policy for interrogation and detention of "military combatants" — what critics have labeled the "torture memo."
</blockquote>

Funny, I wasn't aware the latter was an authorization of the former. Seems fitting that people who have trouble relating and correlating cause and effect would find covering one's head with a plastic bag as useful intellectual exercise.
2.7.2008 4:34pm
Andrew Morton:
Doh. Not sure what happened to the quote formatting above. They're from the article.
2.7.2008 4:35pm
Justin (mail):
What exactly is the objection to the Yale students' behavior? I'm still trying to figure out why people are offended.
2.7.2008 4:37pm
I was a law student once, alas... (mail):
It beats studying.
2.7.2008 4:38pm
what about pakistan:
It's kinda sad that Pakistani lawyers are more visibly opposed to the dismantling of their legal system than American lawyers.

I feel bad that I didn't participate in like protests when given the opportunity in law school.
2.7.2008 4:39pm
ejo:
who's offended-they're just preening twerps. this school, of course, is also offended by the presence of anything military. really, would anything that was designed to actually protect us be accepted at this fine institution?
2.7.2008 4:41pm
Mike& (mail):
I guess I view it was more complicated than others here.

On the one hand, you should be civil. On the other hand, should you just pretend that Bybee didn't bend, twist, and manipulate the law in writing those torture memos? John Yoo has taken almost all of the heat for that; but Bybee was Yoo's boss.

(The reason that Yoo takes so much heat is because he is a law professor. Few people want to take on a federal judge.)

So while I'm not condoning what the students did, I don't think the issue is as simple as others make it out to be.
2.7.2008 4:46pm
Mike& (mail):
who's offended-they're just preening twerps. this school, of course, is also offended by the presence of anything military. really, would anything that was designed to actually protect us be accepted at this fine institution?


I imagine if the United States were under a military invasion, few at Yale or anywhere else would have an issue with soldiers defending the country.

The issue is whether we need to be in Iraq. The issue is whether being in Iraq "protects us." Some very smart people (in good faith) say yes; some other very smart people (also in good faith) say no.

So, again, I don't think the issue is as simple as you make it out to be.
2.7.2008 4:48pm
windycityatty:
Three cheers for the lawstudents!! I was fortunate enough to be in lawschool during the run up to the iraq war. Massive protests in Chicago, the whole works.

Unfortunately, most of my fellow classmates were too chicken shit to do anything and had no real care for anything other than there stupid grades and summer clerkships.

Non-violent civil disobedience, assuming a good reason for it, should always be encouraged. I think Bybee's role in fashioning an executive policy that arguably violates international treaties we have signed and the u.s. constituion and the moral sensibilities of a few billion people is cause for such protest.

The only relevant question is whether if we were at Yale, and this guy or Yoo or someone else is coming to our school to talk and someone asks you to join in the protest - would you do it?

I know I would have. And its has nothing whatsoever to do with sensibilities or politiness or whether it was the right forum or method - its for the sole fact that Mr. Bybee WOULD BE FORCED to see that he does not work in a bubble and that his decisions, whether from the bench or from inside the executive branch, have consequences and that people will connect him directly to those consequences.

From what i understand, only students were allowed to enter the speech/debate (no media, etc...) so this wasn't about getting attention for themselves (like the infamous 'dont tase me bro' guy). It was about confronting Mr Bybee. Im sure he wasnt expecting it at Yale of all places, which makes it all the sweeter.
2.7.2008 4:50pm
Mark Field (mail):

John Yoo has taken almost all of the heat for that; but Bybee was Yoo's boss.


The claim is that Yoo wrote the memo and Bybee "merely" signed it. That's not much of an excuse, even if it's true (and I have no idea if it is or not), but it explains some of the focus on Yoo.
2.7.2008 4:50pm
rarango (mail):
Seems to me OSHA should have stepped in--arent there warning labels on plastic bags?

Mike: I take your point, but perhaps the student questions could't be heard under their plastic bags. Seems to me they missed a real chance to find out his reasaoning.
2.7.2008 4:51pm
Dave N (mail):
I wonder how many of these protesters are also sending Judge Bybee their resumes so that he can consider them for judicial clerkships.
2.7.2008 4:53pm
Mike& (mail):
What exactly is the objection to the Yale students' behavior? I'm still trying to figure out why people are offended.


Here is what cracks me up. People want to call the Yalies "tweeps" and weenies, and stuff like that. Yet the people calling the names are the ones all aghast.

I don't know. I have a pretty strong stomach and don't "take to the bed" like an 1800's Southern Belle over stuff like this. I might not necessarily approve, but I'm not banging on a keyboard because my delicate nerves have been disturbed.

You gotta wonder.... Who are the real twerps.... the protesters, or the people who are so delicate that they "pitch fits" over protests like these?
2.7.2008 4:54pm
Mike& (mail):
Mike: I take your point, but perhaps the student questions could't be heard under their plastic bags. Seems to me they missed a real chance to find out his reasaoning.



It all comes down to a goal. is your goal to "reason together." Often this is the best course. But can you reason with people like Judge Bybee? Some would say you can't.

Thus, the goal becomes to express your disapproval. Maybe you can win the hearts and minds of others through this emotional tactic.

Again, I am not defending the students' actions. I generally think that an academic environment is not the place for protests - even "silent" ones like these. ("Silent" is in quotes since the symbolic speech was loud and clear!)

But that's just my take. Others have strong reasons to disagree.

Incidentally, when Yale hosted William F. Buckley as a graduation speaker, a bunch of students stood up and turned their backs on him. When Yale hosted Hillary Clinton as a graduation speaker, conservative students asked Buckley whether they should return the favor. He advised otherwise.

I tend to think Buckley was right.
2.7.2008 5:03pm
Fred F.:
Mike& says:


I imagine if the United States were under a military invasion, few at Yale or anywhere else would have an issue with soldiers defending the country.


One doesn't have to imagine that the US is under attack, and it was in the context of that attack (9/11, remember it?) that Bybee wrote the so-called torture memo, not with respect to Iraq. As has been confirmed in the last few days, the most controvsial technique -- waterboarding -- was used on only the most heinous terrorists in a time of very real threat. Unfortunately, however, few at Yale lift a finger to do anything that helps those defending this country. Instead, they support the legal actions of terrorists and file frivolous lawsuits against public servants. But hey, you assure us that "few at Yale . . . would have an issue with soldiers defending the country." How charitable of them. We'll remember to be grateful for those at Yale when al Qaeda next attacks. That will really make a difference.
2.7.2008 5:05pm
ejo:
wow, that's quite a lengthy diatribe from someone not flustered. we should all be so composed. Couldn't they, in lieu of plastic bags, have been doing pro bono work for terrorists or contributing to the Lynne Stewart Defense Fund?
2.7.2008 5:10pm
Ferkl (mail):
Now we have to stand in the tea chest and sing...
2.7.2008 5:14pm
rarango (mail):
I don't have any problems with students doing this sort of thing; for many of them it will be the last time they get to exercise any independent activity. Protest activity is almost always a good thing for the republic--Plus these guys are going to be schlepping partner's coffee and trying to generate unachievable billable hours for the next 10 years of their lives. Give them a break and let them enjoy studenthood.
2.7.2008 5:15pm
Federal Dog:
Since they could find nothing substantive to say, they fittingly put garbage bags on their heads.
2.7.2008 5:27pm
ronnie dobbs (mail):

What exactly is the objection to the Yale students' behavior?


It's disrespectful and inappropriate. Their actions aren't going to do anything to affect Bybee's conduct at OLC--i.e., they're not trying to protect human rights by protesting in favor of a particular course of action with respect to a pending decision--rather, they're just expressing their contempt for Bybee in a gratuitously rude way. A few pointed questions to Judge Bybee would be much more appropriate and befitting future lawyers, particularly those hailing from what purports to be America's leading law school.
2.7.2008 5:27pm
Justin (mail):
A public figure who signs off on a memo allowing for torture is not exactly the person who has the right to expect decorum when speaking in public fora. Nor is there any inclination that they were being verbally disruptive to Bybee or otherwise infringing on his ability to get his message across.

Is it rude to make a woman who wants an abortion to have to look at graphic displays or pass through people wearing props as she walks into a clinic? I don't think so, to be honest.
2.7.2008 5:31pm
TN DC Atty (mail):
More importantly, was the topic really "federalism and criminal law," as reported? What other Hot Topics of Eight Years Ago do the YLSers of today need to be caught up on?
2.7.2008 5:31pm
dejapooh (mail):
I don't know. It seems to me that they made a quiet, respectable protest. When asked to leave, they did. They made their point, right or wrong in a peaceful manner. Good for them.
2.7.2008 5:37pm
FC:
Yeah Bybee, yeah!
2.7.2008 5:46pm
Bender (mail):
Why am I disturbed with the Yale students' behavior? Maybe because it's just as childish, silly, and non-constructive as eating goldfish. These kind of stunts don't persuade anyone of the rightness of the students' position. (Actually they don't even explicate that position. Perhaps the students were demonstrating for the constitutionality of asphyxiation as an adjunct to sexual pleasure.) In fact, stunts like this frequently turn undecided persons against these privileged young people and the causes they purport to be demonstrating for. The students would have had an opportunity during the question period to forcefully and effectively present their position. Instead they were lazy, entertained themselves, and played to their audience of true believers while doing nothing positive for their cause.
2.7.2008 5:48pm
Elliot123 (mail):
Perhaps someone caught it on film and can put it on YouTube? I'm sure the students would have no objection to having their protest get wider distribution.
2.7.2008 6:03pm
Randy R. (mail):
Well, it's pretty clear there that the reason most people are upset over the student;s actions are because they believe torturing people is good. They have no problem with Bybee's action, and believe that they know better than anyone else what is good for the country.

The students didn't try to shout down Bybee, and when asked to leave, did so. Sometimes the point of protest is to merely remind the people in power that not everyone agrees with them.

Fred F. "few at Yale lift a finger to do anything that helps those defending this country. "

That can be said of about 99% of all Americans. And considering how the Bush administration treats our veterans when they get home, especially if they are in need of medical attention, you would have to include them as well.

I really dislike it when people equate criticism of this administration's policies with a hatred towards our armed forces. It smacks of facsism. Even in this day and age, one can criticize Bush and his policies and still be a loyal American.
2.7.2008 6:05pm
American Psikhushka (mail) (www):
Bender-

Why am I disturbed with the Yale students' behavior? Maybe because it's just as childish, silly, and non-constructive as eating goldfish. These kind of stunts don't persuade anyone of the rightness of the students' position. (Actually they don't even explicate that position. Perhaps the students were demonstrating for the constitutionality of asphyxiation as an adjunct to sexual pleasure.)

Actually there was nothing childish about it. This seemed like a very effective non-violent protest.

If they had tried to ask him pointed questions they likely would have been waived away, told that wasn't the "topic" of the event, ignored, etc. Also, there would have been no media coverage if they had just asked pointed questions and been ignored or waived off. (Not that there was a lot, but there is certainly more than there would have been from just answering questions.)

In fact, stunts like this frequently turn undecided persons against these privileged young people and the causes they purport to be demonstrating for. The students would have had an opportunity during the question period to forcefully and effectively present their position. Instead they were lazy, entertained themselves, and played to their audience of true believers while doing nothing positive for their cause.

See above - pointed or hard-hitting questions would have been waived off or ignored, as they usually are at these kind of events. Plus they would have been ignored by the media.

What happened was the students made the most of their privilege by using their position to confront someone who was involved in subverting and violating our Constitution, the rule of law, fundamental human rights, and our values, standing, and self-respect as a nation. It sounds like only students and faculty were allowed in, and I'm glad these students used their privilege to confront this person in an effective manner that most other people could not.
2.7.2008 6:14pm
Anderson (mail):
Protest activity is almost always a good thing for the republic

Just so. Thank god we live in a country where none of these people is going to jail for having spoken out.
2.7.2008 6:19pm
Federal Dog:
"Thank god we live in a country where none of these people is going to jail for having spoken out."

That's rather the point: They had nothing whatsoever to actually say. They just put garbage bags over their heads.
If they had had some sort of argument, I might grant them a bit of respect or credence. As matters stand, they simply wear garbage bags to class.
2.7.2008 6:30pm
JosephSlater (mail):
Yeah Bybee, yeah!

I'll admit, that brought a smile to my face.
2.7.2008 6:30pm
American Psikhushka (mail) (www):
Fred F-

Unfortunately, however, few at Yale lift a finger to do anything that helps those defending this country. Instead, they support the legal actions of terrorists and file frivolous lawsuits against public servants. But hey, you assure us that "few at Yale . . . would have an issue with soldiers defending the country." How charitable of them. We'll remember to be grateful for those at Yale when al Qaeda next attacks. That will really make a difference.

Al Qaeda has no troop transports, landing craft, or aircraft carriers. They have no large planes or nearby air bases that they could use to drop large units of paratroopers. So there is basically no chance of them invading us.

What they can do is infiltrate people into this country and mount terrorist attacks like bombings, sabotage, etc. The measures that actually could prevent these things - more border control, more port control, more immigration enforcement - have been neglected and marginalized because we have been too busy mounting an illegal attack, invasion, and occupation of a country that had absolutely nothing to do with the 9/11 attacks.

Most people, even those critical of the Iraq War, support our armed forces.(including myself) If our country was in actual danger of being invaded and there was a draft most people would report for duty. But that isn't the case here: The Iraq War is a war of choice that is actually making us less safe and causing the amount of terrorists or terrorist sympathizers to increase. All the while measures that could actually prevent another 9/11 are being neglected because we are too busy spending money hand over fist on an unnecessary, illegal war of choice in Iraq.
2.7.2008 6:31pm
windycityatty:
I think its hilarious that people think the "protesters" would have accomplished more by simply asking pointed questions to Bybee after the "debate" regarding his role in the torture memo's.

This is complete BS. If anyone would have asked about his top secret authorization of secret interrogation methods of secret prisoners held in secret locations the last thing he would have done, (in the context of a debate focused on federalism and criminal law) is give a response. According to anyone in the Bush administration -its all 'secret'. Im sure he has a gag order or some-such preventing him from answering anything in other than vague generalities anyway.
Likely, the moderator would have simply said the question is off topic and prevented any response.

Although a good question on the topic at hand could have been: "With the massive expansion of the federal criminal law over the last 50 years and given the upheaval of federal sentencing guidelines within the last 5 years, do you think your service as a federal judge would qualify you for a downward departure from the presumptive guideline range after you are convicted for your role in enabling torture?"

Seems to be on topic, eh?
2.7.2008 6:34pm
Mike& (mail):
That's rather the point: They had nothing whatsoever to actually say. They just put garbage bags over their heads.


Given that you do not understand symbolic speech, I can, consistent with the VC's civility policy (hey, if they don't understand, it's not uncivil, right?), flip you the bird.

(Mike gives you the bird, walks away and whistles, having done nothing offensive or uncivil.)
2.7.2008 6:46pm
Federal Dog:
It is too bad that all that you can think to do when someone disagrees with you is to make an obscene gesture. If you are genuinely confused about the difference between wearing a garbage bag on your head and meaningful dissent, I feel all the more sorry for you.
2.7.2008 7:18pm
Visitor Again:
That's rather the point: They had nothing whatsoever to actually say. They just put garbage bags over their heads.
If they had had some sort of argument, I might grant them a bit of respect or credence. As matters stand, they simply wear garbage bags to class.


Then if they said nothing, why are you so exorcised, you old windbag?
2.7.2008 7:34pm
Visitor Again:
exorciwed should have been exercised in the sense of put out
2.7.2008 7:36pm
Federal Dog:
You should calm down and think before you vent.
2.7.2008 8:04pm
Anderson (mail):
They had nothing whatsoever to actually say. They just put garbage bags over their heads.

Federal Dog, if anyone offers you tickets to the ballet, just politely decline, is my advice.

Ditto the symphony. They will play music for hours with no words at all.
2.7.2008 8:20pm
Barry P. (mail):
yet, if a genocidal iranian psychopath gave a speech there, they would listen respectfully and not utter a peep.

What, is that what happened when the Shah spoke there?
2.7.2008 8:31pm
Scott Forster (mail):
I love it when people say basically "Iraq did not do 9/11 so the invasion was a mistake". These are probably the same people who would have done nothing to Italy and Germany after Pearl Harbor since, after all, they did not attack us at Pearl Harbor. I am glad we took out Hitler and Mussolini and I am equally glad we took out Sadaam Hussein. To say that the war was, on balance, a bad thing is to admit that, on balance, the world would be better off with Sadaam in it. I disagree.

That said, I do have 2 problems with waterboarding. First, we do not do it enough. Second, we are in a drought.
2.7.2008 9:36pm
Randy R. (mail):
Generally speaking, Scott Forster, we appreciate intelligent observations, not idiotic statements. When Japan attacked us in Pearl Harbor, we declared war upon Japan. We did NOT declare war upon Germany or Italy.

Instead, Hitler declared war upon us, thereby committing one of the worst blunders of his regime. there was no need to declare war upon us, as we never invaded or threatened Germany in any war. Most historians find that this was this mistake cost him the war.

Once Germany declared war upon us, we had no choice but to declare war upon him, and so we entered WWII.

We were invaded by members of al Qaeda, most of whom were citizens of Saudi Arabia. Iraq, as Dick Cheney and George Bush admitted several times, was not behind 9/11. Yet we, like Hitler, declared war upon a country that did not attack us in any way, and there was no evidence that they would attack us either. (remember, there actually were no WMD).

So your analogy only serves to prove that when you invade a country that for no reason, only ruin comes to you. Thanks.
2.7.2008 9:48pm
Scott Forster (mail):
I suppose it comes down to this: I could not care less what extreme techniques we use on these Muslim savages. These Yale students seem to support killing unborn children considerbly more than they support killing terrorists. Last I checked, since we got (somewhat) aggressive in killing our enemies, we have not been attacked again. Am I wrong?
2.7.2008 10:19pm
alias:
Hilarious photo. If I were at Yale, I'd probably find the protestors annoying, but it sounds like they were minimally disruptive.

I just read Jack Goldstein's book. I hope the people with bags on their heads do too at some point. It doesn't vindicate Bybee or anything, but it's a very different perspective on the whole OLC thing than I'm used to seeing in the news and on the blogs.
2.7.2008 10:26pm
ray:
Some of the comments indicate as little knowledge of Judge Bybee, Iraq and our actions there, and our need for oil. What would some of you do if the US couldn't secure sufficient oil to you a means of driving to your office every day? Will you ride your bike? When the grocery supply truck has no fuel to make deliveries to your market will you demonstrate in the streets with a bag over your empty heads? Iraq is one of the largest oil suppliers in the world and the U.S. needs to continue purchasing their supplies while providing Iraq with needed currency to pay their bills. So some of you think Iraq was some harmless victim?
2.7.2008 10:32pm
Duncan Frissell (mail):

when about 25 Yale Law School students in the audience stood up and sheathed their heads in black trash bags, in imitation of hooded military prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

Jay Bybee, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit who, when he was head of the Bush administration's Office of Legal Counsel, signed off on a controversial policy for interrogation and detention of "military combatants" — what critics have labeled the "torture memo."


"Funny, I wasn't aware the latter was an authorization of the former."

Right. The Abu Ghraib prisoners were legally lawful combatants under the Geneva Conventions in accordance with official US policy announced at the beginning of hostilities.
2.7.2008 10:38pm
Randy R. (mail):
Scott: "I could not care less what extreme techniques we use on these Muslim savages"

Sounds like you just want to use torture as a means of revenge. I guess that's okay, so just don't complain when these "Muslin savages" use torture on our men, as you will have forfeited any right to object.

Of course, there is little evidence that torture has gotten us good information, and it has actually obtained a lot of bad information (i.e., lies.) So again, I can only imagine that you want to torture out of some sort of revenge fantasy. I wouldn't complain when other countries view us as just another thug on the block, instead of the high ideals that we have always maintained in previous wars.
2.7.2008 10:51pm
Bob from Ohio (mail):
Very effective I am sure. About as effective as those "massive" demonstrations before the war.

No giant puppets though. Can't have a decent left wing demonstration without giant puppets.
2.7.2008 11:15pm
Elliot123 (mail):
"These are probably the same people who would have done nothing to Italy and Germany after Pearl Harbor since, after all, they did not attack us at Pearl Harbor."

Interesting. So, Roosevelt led the nation to war against Germany when Germany had not attacked us. And Truman led the nation to war when North Korea had not attacked us. And Kennedy led the nation to war when North Viet Nam had not attacked us. And Clinton led the nation to war when Yugoslavia had not attacked us.
2.7.2008 11:34pm
American Psikhushka (mail) (www):
ray-

What would some of you do if the US couldn't secure sufficient oil to you a means of driving to your office every day?

With regard to Iraq's portion of supply, that would never happen. We're the number one market for oil in the world. Even if they tried to boycott us, some enterprising country would buy from them, tack on a couple percent, and sell it to us. Oil's a commodity, even if they didn't sell to us they would be satisfying someone else's demand and therefore putting downward pressure on prices.

So some of you think Iraq was some harmless victim?

Basically. The Iraqi people certainly were harmless victims. In the context of 9/11 they certainly were. Sadam was your run of the mill vicious despot. There's a number of them out there. Some neocons just decided that they were going to try to remake the Middle East.
2.8.2008 2:05am
American Psikhushka (mail) (www):
Mike&-

(Mike gives you the bird, walks away and whistles, having done nothing offensive or uncivil.)

The worst is when peeping toms who are rudely violating your privacy complain about rude gestures. Criminals complaining about the natural reaction to their crimes.
2.8.2008 2:13am
Anderson (mail):
I could not care less what extreme techniques we use on these Muslim savages

If only all of you were so honest about your motives.
2.8.2008 8:34am
Happyshooter:
That's rather the point: They had nothing whatsoever to actually say. They just put garbage bags over their heads.

I think using garbage bags over their heads was dumb because it gives those on the other side an easy shot.

I could not care less what extreme techniques we use on these Muslim savages

If only all of you were so honest about your motives.


I am honest. Their lives are worth less than the life of an American, and their 'rights' matter less than the rights of my pet animals.

You seem to feel differently. I think you are wrong.
2.8.2008 9:19am
ejo:
you're talking to deaf ears with the moral preeners. they would gladly see millions die rather than KSM being waterboarded. it's that simple with them, at least until a Dem assumes the presidency and realizes the threat we actually face.
2.8.2008 9:38am
Q the Enchanter (mail) (www):
Richard's right. Surely we should limit protest to those with proper academic credentials.
2.8.2008 12:21pm
methodact:
There are no polymaths here. Well, correction, there's one, and she's a college student, but she so far has only deigned to leave but a single comment on this blog.
2.8.2008 1:35pm
Brian G (mail) (www):
That says nothing about Bybee. It says a lot about the Yale Law Students, who don't seem to want to hear anything they might disagree with.
2.8.2008 2:05pm
Federal Dog:
"It says a lot about the Yale Law Students, who don't seem to want to hear anything they might disagree with."


In that case, they'd need much thicker bags. Not to mention, as Bob correctly states, puppets. At least one great, big, giant puppet.

Where were the Free Mumia!!! people anyway? These kids need to learn how to mount a protest.
2.8.2008 2:54pm
Randy R. (mail):
Happyshooter: "I am honest. Their lives are worth less than the life of an American, and their 'rights' matter less than the rights of my pet animals. "

I'll one up you. Let's kill them all and let God sort them out . America is No. 1! Woo-hoo!
2.8.2008 4:11pm
Fred the Fourth (mail):
RandyR says:
don't complain "when these 'Muslin savages' use torture on our men"

"When"?

How's the weather in your universe?
2.8.2008 8:24pm
Steve2:

Last I checked, since we got (somewhat) aggressive in killing our enemies, we have not been attacked again.

Last I checked, there'd only been one noteworthy-enough-for-me-to-know-about-it foreign terrorist attack on U.S. soil prior to 2001: World Trade Center, 1993. Seems to me the prior strategy was working just fine.
2.9.2008 9:47am