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Map of America from a Japanese Game:

Yukihime reports:

In a pique of boredom this evening I scanned in and annotated the map that comes with Tengai Makyou: Daishi no Mokushiroku (The 4th Apocalypse). This is a Saturn RPG famed for its historical parody humor; the first three games take place in Japan, but the fourth is set in America.

This map is basically what would happen if you got a bunch of Japanese guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about America on a bar napkin.

Funny; and thanks to GeekPress, which should be on your regular reading list.

18 USC 1030 (mail):

This map is basically what would happen if you got a bunch of Japanese guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about America on a bar napkin.


What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about Japan on a bar napkin?
6.11.2007 5:29pm
Daniel Chapman (mail):
Still not as funny as www.engrish.com
6.11.2007 5:32pm
Zathras (mail):
Is this map really any worse than the map on the game of Risk of the parts of the Soviet Union, or of much else of the world?
6.11.2007 5:33pm
K Parker (mail):
Funnier, but less sobering, than the map I saw on the back wall of the Aeroflot office in Nairobi. This was in the early 80's, just after they'd instituted the Moscow-Washington D.C. flights. The office was on one of the main downtown streets in Nairobi, and featured floor-to-ceiling windows facing the sidewalk, and a route map painted on the back wall.

There, for all the world to see, was an arc that began in Moscow, over the north Atlantic, and touched down .... somewhere near Kansas City! Oh, sure, the capitalist/imperialists can claim their capital is on the coast, right where any idiot could sail their navy right up to it, but even we don't think they could actually be that dumb, right??? Clearly this is just some kind of ruse, but we're not falling for it.
6.11.2007 5:41pm
Sean O'Hara (mail) (www):
Interesting what they see as the highlights of the US -- I wouldn't expect them to know about Minneapolis and St. Paul (and why does St. Paul have a giant perpetual-motion drinking bird?). Of course, they also think Missouri is a city.
6.11.2007 5:58pm
A.C.:
And how many Carlsbad Caverns are there really? Where are they supposed to be? I've never bothered to find out, but this map raises intriguing possibilities.
6.11.2007 6:09pm
Connie (mail):
Reminds me of the New Yorker's view of the world.


6.11.2007 6:21pm
PatHMV (mail) (www):
My reaction was the same at 18 USC 1030's... I'm scared to imagine how we may have mangled other countries in similar games! As a resident of Louisiana, I'm glad we made it on the map.
6.11.2007 6:22pm
Connie (mail):
Oops, there was supposed to be a link in that comment.

http://www.adambaumgoldgallery.com/steinberg/posters/
view_of_new_york.jpg

(Remove space to make it work; the "link" function doesn't seem to work for me.)
6.11.2007 6:22pm
Gabriel Malor (mail):
Sean, I notice that San Fransisco Bay features prominently.
6.11.2007 6:22pm
Dave N (mail):
What 18 USC 1030 said. Now quick, even sober, how many of you know where Yokohama, Kobe, and Osaka are in relation to Tokyo--and generally where Tokyo is on a map of Japan?
6.11.2007 6:23pm
Guest3000:
Isn't it weird that *both* Minneapolis and St. Paul (and "Alcatraz"!) warrant separate mention, but our capital, Washington D.C., doesn't?
6.11.2007 6:34pm
Milhouse (www):


This map is basically what would happen if you got a bunch of Japanese guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about America on a bar napkin.

What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about Japan on a bar napkin?

What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about America on a bar napkin?
6.11.2007 6:39pm
s806:
The Northernmost must be "New Carlsbad Caverns" and the southern caverns are part of Mexico.

As a Texan, I must say the oceanfront property in El Paso looks great.
6.11.2007 6:55pm
Bill Woods (mail):
What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about America on a bar napkin?

Never mind getting drunk. Take a blank sheet of paper and try to draw a map of the lower 48 states, getting them roughly to a consistent scale.
6.11.2007 7:02pm
ScottD:
Minneapolis/St. Paul is generally because of the frequent Northwest Airlines service from Toyko, I'm guessing. Seriously, what other airport in the USA has bilingual signs with Japanese as the 2nd language? You see tourists at "The Mall" all the time.
6.11.2007 7:12pm
Peter Wimsey:
I find it interesting that my city, Indianapolis, has not only been moved to the coast, but is also the northernmost city in the continental US and is apparently situated at the base of a giant waterfall or glacier. I wonder what strange experience they had in Indiana that led to this placement.
6.11.2007 7:14pm
Bill Poser (mail) (www):
Actually, if you want to embaress Japanese people, get them to try to read the placenames on a Japanese-language map of Hokkaido. If they have not spent time in Hokkaido, they will be unable to read many of the placenames because they are Japanized Ainu words written phonologically using unusual readings of the Chinese characters.

As I recall, at the height of the Vietnam war a poll showed that 60% of US adults were unable to locate Vietnam on a map of the world and 40% were unsure whether the US was at war with North Vietnam or South Vietnam. (And not, in most cases, because of the subtlety of the question of whose said the US was on.)
6.11.2007 7:16pm
Taeyoung (mail):
What 18 USC 1030 said. Now quick, even sober, how many of you know where Yokohama, Kobe, and Osaka are in relation to Tokyo--and generally where Tokyo is on a map of Japan?

O-yasui go-you!

Also, I think the correct reading of the name is "Dai-yon no Mokushiroku." I've just never heard "Dai-shi." Could be wrong, though -- I'm not Japanese.
6.11.2007 7:22pm
DR:
I don't think anyone has quite mentioned it -- but this map is seriously inaccurate in places.
6.11.2007 7:48pm
Bill Poser (mail) (www):
Taeyoung:


I think the correct reading of the name is "Dai-yon no Mokushiroku." I've just never heard "Dai-shi."


Its true that daiyon with the kun reading is probably more common since the on (Sino-Japanese) reading of "four" is homophonous with "death" and considered inauspicious, but daishi also occurs, and there is even a Daishi Bank: http://www.daishi-bank.co.jp.
6.11.2007 8:18pm
Ken Arromdee:
You guys (and probably the original article) are missing the point of the map, which several posters on Yukihime have already mentioned: it's not *supposed* to be an accurate map, but a parody, and the series is filled with inaccurate interpretations of Japanese culture, so throwing in an inaccurate map of America is no big deal. Pointing to this map as if it means something is like pointing to the Flintstones and saying "how stupid the writers are, they didn't know that cavemen never used talking animals for household appliances".

You'd think people would at least look up Tengai Makyou on Wikipedia first before jumping to conclusions based on the map.
6.11.2007 8:26pm
genob:
I have driven from Missouri to New Orleans...I must say I missed the offramp for Mount Rushmore on that trip.
6.11.2007 8:27pm
Alan K. Henderson (mail) (www):
What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about Japan on a bar napkin?
I'd make two predictions:

1. Hiroshima is placed on Kyushu (my first guess before I looked at the map) instead of the southern coast of Honshu. "We flew that far north to drop the bomb? Duuude."

2. Shikoku is merged with Honshu.

Back to the US map...what is that covering the ground in Michigan and New Tork? Craters, or Wisconsin cheese?
6.11.2007 8:48pm
WHOI Jacket:
I honestly didn't know that Kyoto and Osaka were under an hour's drive from each other until I visited there. We spent days in Kyoto looking at shrines and temples, then found some dingy bars in Osaka, it was great.
6.11.2007 9:37pm
William Oliver (mail) (www):
"We spent days in Kyoto looking at shrines and temples, then found some dingy bars in Osaka, it was great."

Heh. Reminds me of a time I went to the Netherlands when I was a graduate student. A Dutch friend of mine offered to show me his country. He said it would take about a day and a half to touch every major city. He was right.
6.11.2007 10:23pm
Bored Lawyer:
Most interesting that Canada seems to have fallen in to the Arctic Ocean, while Mexico is there and doing quite well.
6.11.2007 11:29pm
Cory Olson (mail):
This is a proud, proud day for the Twin Cities.

People in St. Paul must be especially happy with this map. St. Paul barely makes it on TWIN CITIES maps these days. It's now Minneapolis and that little development off to the east on your way to Woodbury.
6.12.2007 1:10am
Bill Poser (mail) (www):
The Twin Cities, that's where WKRP in Cincinatti takes place, isn't it? :)
6.12.2007 1:40am
Abandon:

Most interesting that Canada seems to have fallen in to the Arctic Ocean, while Mexico is there and doing quite well.


In fact, New York seems to be sitting on Montreal island as Seattle, who didn't know, is correctly part in Yukon and Yellowstone is in Alberta. Who didn't know Canada was the 51st state yet?
6.12.2007 6:34am
Jay Manifold (mail) (www):
Missouri has been demoted to city status (though perhaps compensated by the transfer of Mt Rushmore to the Ozarks), placing it alongside Yellowstone, Carlsbad Caverns, and ... Alcatraz?

But I've gotta say, that's one wicked cool version of the Sears Tower in Chicago! Daley the Younger, call your office ...
6.12.2007 10:39am
tcg (mail):

In fact, New York seems to be sitting on Montreal island as Seattle, who didn't know, is correctly part in Yukon and Yellowstone is in Alberta. Who didn't know Canada was the 51st state yet?

Actually, I think that's backward. Canada is omitted from the map because it's not part of the US (see Alaska as unattached to North America). Mexico, OTOH has become the 51st state (see no border distinguishing Mexico from Texas or Arizona)... certainly as a result of the current immigration "crisis".
6.12.2007 10:54am
das_bolt (mail):

it's not *supposed* to be an accurate map, but a parody, and the series is filled with inaccurate interpretations of Japanese culture, so throwing in an inaccurate map of America is no big deal.


Good point. Also, keep in mind the game is set after the 4th Apocalypse. With a few exceptions (the Alaskan "Ice Palace" comes to mind...) the map is more or less a plausible rendition of the US might look like after a massive rise in sea levels. Hence the Disappearance of Washington DC and New York city becoming an Island.
6.12.2007 3:14pm
markm (mail):
Peter: That looks sort of like Niagara Falls to me, although it's somehow transited to the St Lawrence river. (I thought it was moving west, not east, as the swirl at the bottom of the falls eats away at the base of the rock face.) Just don't ask me how Indianapolis and Michigan moved to the east and south of the falls, respectively, except that obviously us Michiganders would have to relocate somewhere when Hudson's Bay reached south to merge with the Great Lakes.
6.12.2007 4:55pm
Warmongering Lunatic (mail):
ScottD -- "what other airport in the USA has bilingual signs with Japanese as the 2nd language?"

Detroit Metro. Which is also a Northwestern hub.

A.C. -- Start at El Paso, the far western tip of Texas. Go east along the Texas-NM line between one-half and two-thirds of the way before it converts to a north-south line. Carlsbad Caverns is just a smidgen north of there.
6.12.2007 6:52pm
Just John:

What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about Japan on a bar napkin?

One scribbled waning-moon shape, with small dots on either end for islands, and a dot marked "Tokyo" in the middle of the moon. Unless a liberal is present, in which case there's a second dot - somewhere on the main island - marked "Kyoto." Someone would eventually think of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the rest of the bunch would vote him down, saying that those cities were nuked and therefore no longer existed.
6.12.2007 8:38pm
JB:
What would happen if you got a bunch of American guys in a room, got them drunk, and then asked them to draw what they could remember about Japan on a bar napkin?


A tentacle monster, a samurai, and a schoolgirl, all fighting Godzilla.

What, you wanted a map? It's somewhere in Asia.
6.14.2007 9:56pm