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Uncle Leo's Kennkarte:

Eric Muller has another powerful post his great-uncle Leopold, and the significance of finding his kennkarte ("identity card") in the gestapo file. Apparently Leopold was deported without his identification papers, but the kennkarte was found and kept in Nazi files — where it remained until Eric's discovery.

UPDATE: Eric Muller has posted an index of all his Uncle Leopold posts here.

Related Posts (on one page):

  1. Uncle Leo's Kennkarte:
  2. Muller's Medals - Update
  3. Muller's Medals:
Happyshooter:
The United States is doing something similar for military honors. Over the last 10 years they are searching veteran's criminal histories and removing honors for those who have been convicted of a crime, or could have been convicted under a "clear and convincing" standard, for which they could have been sentenced to life imprisonment.

Lately they have been digging up graves in national cemeteries for disposal.
4.24.2007 12:29pm
Fub:
What impresses me is the dogged bureaucratic thoroughness with which these monsters pursued their purpose. When Leo was found without his card, they searched his house, found the card, and sent it forward within days.

The sheer number of man-hours devoted to absurdly niggling details relative to the enormity of their project reveals a mentality anesthetized to ends through focus upon legalistic means. This example of each participant's capacity to ignore a pristinely evil and inhuman purpose, or to rationalize it, through his focus on the chaff of quotidian operational detail, should stand as a warning to us all.

We owe thanks to Eric's Uncle Leo for losing his card, whether on purpose or inadvertantly. By doing so, he provided us a revealing glimpse into how pure evil operates, which we can hope better equips us to prevent it.
4.24.2007 2:08pm
Houston Lawyer:
I am no longer amazed that such a post draws comments comparing the Bush administration to Nazi Germany. Here we have an amazing story by a man who quite unexpectedly found out about the dismal fate of his relative. This is quickly followed by morons trying to spin his tale for their political purposes. SSDD
4.24.2007 3:34pm
buzz (mail):
re the first comment about removing honors from soldiers and/or digging them up. I don't buy any of that. Really going to have to see some sort of site.
The story about Uncle Leo is indeed amazing, but it is more than that. Looking at his picture, what do you think he was suspecting about his government at that time? It's just mind boggling that so many people could facilitate so much evil. He wasn't stripped of his possessions and shipped away to the camps by just Hitler, or even the SS. The common Policeman, the railroad workers, so many people participated. Amazing indeed.
4.24.2007 6:22pm
Happyshooter:
The lastest version of the law is 38 USC 2411. The first man dug up under the latest changes to the law was Russell Wagner.
4.24.2007 6:32pm
Happyshooter:
Oh, and the push for this law didn't start with a GOP leader. Clinton pushed the first version after Ok City.

It still does not make the law right.
4.24.2007 7:00pm
Malvolio:
Clinton pushed the first version after Ok City. It still does not make the law right.
It doesn't make it right, but it is.

A national cemetery is supposed to be a place of honor.

Russell Wayne Wagner seems to have been a career scumball, an addict, thief, and murderer, who died before he could serve a tiny fraction of his sentence. He doesn't deserve to lie next to some guy who spent three years working the motor pool at Fort Meade, let alone a Medal of Honor winner -- or more accurately, the families of those soldiers, and the children of Daniel and Wilda Davis, the octogenarian couple Wagner murdered for smack money, deserve better than to see his gravesite there with those of decent people.

The cemetery administration acccurately points out that it has neither the brief nor the budget to investigate every stiff sent their way -- but in this case, the middle name should have been a big clue.
4.25.2007 12:19am
Fub:
Houston Lawyer wrote at 4.24.2007 2:34pm:
I am no longer amazed that such a post draws comments comparing the Bush administration to Nazi Germany. Here we have an amazing story by a man who quite unexpectedly found out about the dismal fate of his relative. This is quickly followed by morons trying to spin his tale for their political purposes. SSDD
I just revisited this thread and realized that only my comment and one other preceded yours. Your words suggest that I am one of the "morons trying to spin his tale for their political purposes".

Whether I am a moron is a matter I'll not contest, although I may have erroneously inferred from your use of the plural that you intended the appellation to apply to my comment.

My comment had nothing to do with the Bush administration or any other. Believe it or not, I think that any human organization can lose its moral way, and that focus upon legalistic or bureaucratic means which obscure or rationalize ends or purposes, is often a symptom of that turpitude. I thought that the story of Uncle Leo's card illustrated that small aspect of the phenomenon. That, only that, and nothing more, was what I intended to convey.

My assertion may be erroneous, and it may even be moronic though I think it is not. I expect that many others, perhaps Hannah Arendt, have made it or some variation far more eloquently than I. But it in no way refers, nor was it intended to refer, to "the Bush administration" or any other particular presidential administration.

I hope that clarifies my point.
4.25.2007 7:14pm
Happyshooter:
You know, Houston, thinking about it...

My comments were that what the german's did wasn't that odd or hard to understand. Here in America we are stripping vets of their past honors earned-- for crimes after the fact. We started for the most serious crimes, and since have already moved to the next lower level.

Given how we do everything else in our system, I expect that lower level serious crimes such as drunk driving will result in a loss of military honors in my lifetime.

From there is will be a short step to stripping honors for the crime of being the wrong race or faith or background.

The real terrible part of the story isn't that the nazis were mean, it was that Germany, which 30-40 years prior had been the world's lighthouse for free thought and advanced science, turned into the most terrible of police states.
4.26.2007 6:39pm