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Blogging and Legal Scholarship:

The Bloggership: How Blogs are Transforming Legal Scholarship Berkman Center (Harvard) symposium is now available on the Washington University (St. Louis) Law Review Slip Opinions site. The papers, including my Scholarship, Blogging, and Trade-Offs: On Discovering, Disseminating, and Doing will also be published in the law review later this year.

Mary Katherine Day-Petrano (mail):
I can't believe there is no discussion in reponse to this thread, particularly the last link.

I think the blegging idea is great, and very useful.

I have found some great ideas for overlooked potential arguments on blogs. Some terrific insights.

It is also handy to test the types of objections you are likely to get from people who oppose your points of view.

Certain blogs post a specialty area of recent, significant, or interesting cases, and sometimes it is much quicker to do research from a blog that has already done some area of up-to-date research on a point. (Ya gotta love the motions being filed in the dontdatehimgirl.com lawsuit. LOL!)

Sometimes you learn a whole bunch of stuff you never knew before -- e.g. numerous comments on Sasha's Medieval wages bleg. Makes for a few moments of pleasure reading.

Blogging is good for determining the popularity of certain issues or points, and sometimes you can do a general statistical survey of how many agree with one point and how many with another.

I think one of my favorites was "a girl walked into a bar exam," the picture of the deteriorated state of everything in/at the apartment at the end was priceless.
1.27.2007 5:54pm