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EPA Libraries Closing Down:

At Biolaw, Rebecca Bratspies reports that the Environmental Protection Agency is "deaccessioning" (i.e. closing) agency libraries thoughout the country. Many regional libraries are already shut down, and the main library in D.C. is slated to close to the public as of October 1. Public access to environmental information from the EPA will be limited largely to that material available on the agency's website and through other government databases, as well as through interlibrary loan with participating institutions.

countertop (mail):
Thats not entirely true. You will still have access to the materials through the FOIA process, as a researcher registered with the archives, or through special request (especially if you can identify the EPA staffers working on the issue).
9.25.2006 7:26pm
Waldensian (mail):
If "deaccessioning" is actually a word, then surely that is a sign that the End is Near.
9.25.2006 8:57pm
AppSocRes (mail):
I suspect that moving to an electronic format will end up saving more trees on net than almost everry other policy the EPA has ever promulgated. Think how many trees might have been saved had this bureaucracy never been created.

By the way, when I did a work-study stint in a library forty years ago deaccessioning was the standard technical term libraries used to encompass all the legwork and paperwork that was required to eliminate a book or other item from the library's collection. My sister recently learned the term while earning her MLS degree. It really is a useful term.
9.25.2006 10:56pm
Waldensian (mail):

By the way, when I did a work-study stint in a library forty years ago deaccessioning was the standard technical term libraries used to encompass all the legwork and paperwork that was required to eliminate a book or other item from the library's collection. My sister recently learned the term while earning her MLS degree. It really is a useful term.

The End is Near!

It really is a hideous word.
9.26.2006 12:43am
Lev:
look on the bright side, it could have been deaccessionizationing
9.26.2006 1:50am
Anon1ms (mail):
Waldensian, you need to get out more often.

Deaccession is, as noted above, a term that has been in use for decades in collecting institutions such as museums and libraries.

Since there is a specific process for entering an object into the institution's collection, usually based on the institution's mission (accession), so too is there a defined process for removing an object (deaccession).

If you google "deaccession," you will get over 90,000 links.
9.26.2006 3:21pm
KCinDC (mail) (www):
Why is deaccessioning any more hideous than, say, repositioning or malfunctioning or decommissioning? I think you need to examine the basis of your objections, Waldensian.
9.27.2006 1:32am
markm (mail):
Just because Waldensian has failed to stop all those other ugly encrustations on the English language is no reason for him to quit trying to stop the next one. Deaccessioning is too deeply rooted in librarian jargon to eliminate now, but why allow it to escape from specialist jargon into general usage?
9.27.2006 4:09pm
markm (mail):
"I suspect that moving to an electronic format will end up saving more trees on net than almost everry other policy the EPA has ever promulgated." That might be true if they were moving to an electronic format, but it seems like instead they're just going to make it harder to see the printed documents. The likely result is that they kill several more forests running off copies of those documents in response to FOIA requests, as compared to letting people read them in a library.

"Think how many trees might have been saved had this bureaucracy never been created." That I wholeheartedly agree with. What's this about having printed documents that aren't available in digital form in the first place? Are they still using typewriters, or are they so inefficient that they can't store the word processed documents? Only in a government agency...
9.27.2006 4:16pm
Craig Oren (mail):
There will be few FOIA requests because, with the libraries closed, few people will know that a particular document exists.
9.27.2006 5:32pm