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Justice Scalia Packing Heat:

Well, OK, it was some decades ago, and "packing heat" usually refers to handguns, not rifles, but here's the item:

"I grew up at a time when people were not afraid of people with firearms," said Scalia, noting that as a youth in New York City he was part of a rifle team at the military school he attended.

"I used to travel on the subway from Queens to Manhattan with a rifle," he said. "Could you imagine doing that today in New York City?"

I'd heard before about this very practice (riflery team members traveling the subways with rifles) before; there's nothing inherently shocking about this, especially to someone who has ridden on Israeli buses, but it's true that by today's standards it's pretty odd.

PersonFromPorlock:
Yeah, as teens we used to be pretty casual about carrying guns, too. Doesn't go over too well when government looks at freedom primarily as an occasion of sin, though.
2.27.2006 12:36pm
Seattle Man:
I assume that the rifle was in a case.
2.27.2006 12:42pm
WB:
The same anecdote (Scalia on the subway with a rifle) shows up in a Scalia profile that was done for the New Yorker about a year ago.

Margaret Talbot, Supreme Confidence, THE NEW YORKER, Mar. 28, 2005
2.27.2006 1:01pm
therut:
I would not call it odd but rather a sad reflection on our culture today. Today we have gun phobia and zero tolerance in our schools and our children have no idea of the freedom their parents had that has been lost. My question is what is wrong with our culture that has brought about this awful change? One thing I think is the government has not and does not want to do what needs to be done to protect the innocent aganist the criminal so the innocents rights and culture is corrupted. Why does not the govenment shut down the gangs like they did the mob. Instead of the government doing its job they take away our rights in order to "protect" us when really they are not protecting us at all. They are protecting themselves. Gun control does nothing to control crime. Look at the recent National Institute of Sciences broad study. They found no evidence that any gun control has done anything to control crime. Except I believe in Boston they thought the gun court of juveniles helped a little. All the background checks,waiting periods, gun bans, one gun a month etc. none can be shown to have done anything. I might mention this study was mandated by Clinton just prior to him leaving office and all but one of the scientists were anti-gun and low and behold they did not find the results they were looking for. Get the book read it even though it is a very boring book of statistics etc.
2.27.2006 1:05pm
Duncan Frissell (mail):
More than 20 years ago in San Francisco's Western Addition neighborhood.

Church caretaker who lived in the church basement wanted to go to the store to cash a check. A friend had just been mugged while doing the same thing so he decided to bring his rifle along for protection.

Transaction proceeded normally (store owner knew him) but on the way home a Muni driver radioed the cops that a man with a rifle was entering the church.

SWAT team surrounded the building.

Police entered his apartment and found a loaded rifle.

On the Multistate Exam (general rule including the SF of 20 years ago) what would the legal result be?

In the majority or jurisdicions -- no crime.

In the event, he was not charged with any crime because open unloaded carry was legal in SF (may still be) and having a loaded firearm in your residence was legal and there was no way to prove open loaded carry within the limits of an incorporated city. So he walked.
2.27.2006 1:09pm
Max (mail):
I once walked through the NY Port Authority bus terminal carrying a sword.

A cop saw me, walked over, looked at the sword, and walked on without saying a word.

Neither the incoming nor the outgoing bus driver said anything, either.
2.27.2006 1:14pm
Sigivald (mail):
Seattle: Naw, probably just slung over the shoulder.

Not much need to have an unloaded bolt-action rifle (or even an M-1, depending on the era and the riflery program) in a case for sheltered carry; it's not like someone can sneakily grab it and start shooting people.

And of course back then it wouldn't cause any undue excitement or concern, as it would now. After all, who'd get upset about a sober-looking young man with a rifle slung on his back obviously on his way to the range, back then, when it was perfectly normal, and without today's tendency to complete ignorant paranoia about firearms? (I mean, a 1903 Springfield or 1917 Enfield rifle isn't a very likely weapon for a subway killing spree...)
2.27.2006 1:20pm
CJColucci (mail):
So who's the better shot, Sclia or Cheney?
2.27.2006 1:22pm
eponymous coward (mail):
Of course, we didn't exactly have people getting shot up on subways and trains when Scalia was a lad.

I also got a chuckle out of someone saying that gangs should be shut down like the mob. You haven't been to Jersey lately, have you? Hint: The Sporanos is not entirely fictitious.
2.27.2006 1:25pm
qwerty:
"Of course, we didn't exactly have people getting shot up on subways and trains when Scalia was a lad."

Of course, gang members now leave their guns home because we have a rule against it.
2.27.2006 1:30pm
Sean Sirrine (mail) (www):
This reminds me of a story that a lead litigator from the NRA told me at the Federalist Society Convention back in November. An old member of the organization told him about being in the military in his youth and having to carry his rifle with him everywhere he went while in uniform. Having a layover on D.C. from his train ride he decided to check out some of the sites:

He went and watched the Senate debate from the gallery with the rifle between his legs. He went to the Whitehouse and was asked by a secret service officer to open the bolt after he was found leaning over the fence for a look at the President. Then, having happily enjoyed his little vacation he got on his airplane where he carried his rifle with him through the whole flight to his destination.

Try doing that in D.C. now!
2.27.2006 1:37pm
Dan Schmutter:
The Sporanos?

Is that a mob family that whacks guys with anthrax?

Dan
2.27.2006 1:40pm
Houston Lawyer:
When I was in High School in the late 70s, it was still common to have rifles and shotguns in the gun rack above the seats of pickup trucks. These could even be found in school parking lots. I remember that we weren't allowed to carry pocket knives to class, but I don't remember any rules about guns in cars.

I always have attributed the disappearance of guns in trucks to the increase in crime. Why keep a nice rifle in your truck if someone might steal it.
2.27.2006 1:45pm
TruthInAdvertising:
I used to see the Navy ROTC rifle drill team crossing the University of Michigan campus carrying their practice rifles and I never remember noticing anyone giving it a second look. This was in the early 1990s and while the rifles weren't functional, I'm sure that 99% of the students who saw them didn't know that.
2.27.2006 1:47pm
Nick (www):
I've found a similar trend with people carrying knives. I've always carried a pocket knife... since I was quite young. In fact, I used to carry one to school in middle school and high school. I actually had very utilitarian uses for it, and for the most part, nobody knew I carried it.

Even as an adult today though, I find I'm usually the only one who does around me. My friends don't... but know I do. Whenever anyone has use for one, they always look to me and ask if they can borrow it, knowing I have it in my pocket.

What's even sadder to me is the fact that most have lost the knowledge of basic knife safety. I always hand them the closed knife. It has a locking blade, and almost none of them know how to properly close it to hand it back to me. Very sad.
2.27.2006 1:49pm
cpugrud:
My high school (Boise High - Boise, Idaho) had a firing range in the basement that was used primarily by the ROTC. In the summer of '88 it was removed to make room for the new computer lab. I won on both counts, both by getting a new computer lab to play in, and getting bussed a few miles away every day to the next closest school owned rifle range.

During my two years of ROTC I regularly carried a rifle openly to, from, and in school. The rifle did have a big metal rod filling the barrel, but that is not something anyone could know from a distance of more than a few inches. I was never questioned by anyone, not on the city bus, city streets, or even riding my bicycle. I was never even questioned on those odd days I would run around with a LAW rocket launcher strapped to my back.

In reflection I'm finding it hard to fathom how deep the damage to our freedoms and our society has become.
2.27.2006 1:49pm
Seamus (mail):

I once walked through the NY Port Authority bus terminal carrying a sword.

A cop saw me, walked over, looked at the sword, and walked on without saying a word.



My wife's tai chi instructor had quite a different experience in Fairfax County, Virginia (I presume much more recently). He was using a sword to practice kendo in what he thought was an isolated spot in the woods, where he wouldn't bother anybody. Apparently some busybody saw him twirling a sword around and called the cops, because he found himself surrounded by a swat team pointing automatic weapons at him (which I strongly suspect were *not* unloaded), and commanding him to lie face down on the ground. When it turned out that he wasn't threatening himself or anyone else, he was let go, but with the kindly advice that he not practice his kendo in a public place anymore, since people were apt not to understand.

(Of course, not threatening anyone isn't quite enough to save you from being shot down by the Fairfax County police, as Salvatore Culosi learned recently.)
2.27.2006 2:02pm
Aaron Brown (mail):
It may be unusual by today's urban standard, but just 6 years ago (still post-columbine) I was a student at Chadron State College in NW Nebraska. While the official rules required we keep our guns in a locked, community room, accepted practice was to keep them in our dorms. We would frequently go dove hunting in between classes, carrying our uncased shotguns between dorms and pickup. Being from Omaha (not big, but urban none the less) I found this amusing, as two years earlier we had practice columbine drills at our high school (Millard North).
2.27.2006 2:03pm
DHBerger (mail):
Something that is often lost in the gun control debate is the enormous difference between rural/suburban and urban life. It is fine for people in sparsely populated areas with large plots of land to have their own guns and to carry them around for hunting or protection or any other reason because this does not significantly affect many other citizens.

But in cities, lax gun laws are an invitation to urban areas' many criminals, and the proliferation of guns on the streets, even among responsible citizens, creates more deadly situations than it prevents. Furthermore, city streets are already heavily patrolled by armed cops who provide safety and firepower against criminals. So while I tend to think that having a gun in one's home for protection should be allowed, concealed weapons on the subway or in other public places should be illegal.

This variety in Americans' ways of life is the reason why most gun laws should be enacted at the state or even local level rather than the federal level.
2.27.2006 2:11pm
te (mail):
I have carried rifles and shotguns several times on public transportation in San Francisco - in cases of course.

Never had any incident. A couple of times people did ask what sort of musical instrument I was carrying . . .
2.27.2006 2:29pm
te (mail):
Oh, and speaking of the urban/rural divide, last year I was in Idaho during Elk season and not only did I routinely see camo clad people walking along roads and highways with their rifles, I saw several people hitchhiking while carrying rifles. (I guess they were trying to go between from camp up to a forest service road or someplace.)

Saw a couple get rides, too.

I don't think I would see that in the SF Bay Area.
2.27.2006 2:33pm
Kevin L. Connors (mail) (www):
A bit of redundancy with the "before" there, Eugene - that's quite unlike you.

In any event, I understand it's quite common for Israeli motorists to pick up armed hitch-hikers, so long as they are in uniform.
2.27.2006 2:39pm
Visitor Again:
I;ve mentioned this story befor4 on the VC. In 1969 on a commercial flight from LAX to Houston for a poverty law conference, I met Don B. kates, who was instrumentql in opening the second amendment debate. Don had been a civil rights lawyer in the South, and he said he never went anywhere without a gun. Right there on the flight, he pulled a case out of his briefcase containing two handguns and expplained that he always carried them that way on commrcial flights to avoid possible trouble.
2.27.2006 3:00pm
Bruce Hayden (mail) (www):
In college, a couple of the guys in my fraternity were avid hunters from LA. When we were pledges, they got us to throw rocks up under the eves of the house next door to flush pigeons for them to shoot from the sundeck on roof. Then, when the cops showed up after receiving reports of shooting within the city limits, the guys down in the living room played dumb. This went on periodically until they both graduated. And, yes, they practiced eating what they killed - though they rarely could get the rest of us interested in roast pigeon.
2.27.2006 3:04pm
Justin (mail):
[snark] Justice Scalia uses his own experience in interpreting the 2nd Amendment. Imeach him!!! [/snark]
2.27.2006 3:19pm
Stormy Dragon (mail) (www):
When I was in High School in the early 1990's, my school had a rifle club. They had converted an abandoned air raid shelter under the school into a rifle range, and once a month, the members would all bring their rifles to school for their shooting meet.

Nobody at the time considered the fact students were bringing rifles to school to be particularly odd. I can't imagine how that would be taken today.
2.27.2006 3:36pm
Al Maviva (mail):

But in cities, lax gun laws are an invitation to urban areas' many criminals, and the proliferation of guns on the streets, even among responsible citizens, creates more deadly situations than it prevents.



Good one. Like the gun bans in the major cities keep things safer? I'm not sure that you have the causation question answered with that ipse dixit.
2.27.2006 3:37pm
Wudndux (mail):
When I was a kid my Dad and I were in the Milwaukee airport with our shotguns (in soft cases) slung over our shoulders for our annual trip to MN for a weekend of duck hunting. A couple of very low key guys in suits asked us where we were going and asked to see our tickets. After we showed that we were ticketed out an hour before Lyndon Johnson arrived they let us go on our way. We handed the guns to the stewardess when we boarded, and she handed them back when we got off.

A few years ago I went thru the archives of my old grade/high school and came across a promotional brochure for prospective students from around 1920 or 1922. The title page graphic was a target's eye view of the high school rifle team. Not likely to see that often anymore, altho I think St. Paul's (private coed boarding school in New Hampshire) still has a rifle or a shotgun team and allows supervised handgun shooting at the indoor range.
2.27.2006 3:47pm
Jaime non-Lawyer:
Reminds me of the time several years ago when I was riding the train in central Europe and the guy in my compartment was cleaing his rifle. I thought to myself that if this was happening in the US I would be freaking out. But since psychos brandishing firearms aren't a big problem in Europe, I figured it was no big deal.
2.27.2006 3:48pm
Al Norris (mail):
"But in cities, lax gun laws are an invitation to urban areas' many criminals, and the proliferation of guns on the streets, even among responsible citizens, creates more deadly situations than it prevents."


This has been the cry of the anti-gun crowd for decades now. Yet everytime a state, with any large urban areas, goes to "shall issue," the crime rates in those urban areas drop. Yet the cry is still made.


"Furthermore, city streets are already heavily patrolled by armed cops who provide safety and firepower against criminals."


Murphy would disagree with you: "There's never a cop around when you need one." Then there's Murphy's corollary: "The police will always show up after the event, to write the report and sweep up the pieces."
2.27.2006 3:57pm
Matt22191 (mail):
Like Nick, I've carried a pocketknife since I was ten or so, including carrying one to school nearly every day from third or fourth grade on. Back then it was a Swiss Army knife with a roughly 3" blade and a few very handy tools. I'd open it up at my desk in the middle of class to sharpen pencils and the like. No one ever questioned it or even, to my knowledge, looked twice. The things that get kids expelled from school these days just boggle my mind. It's no longer just about safety, at least in some places. It's about instilling a mindset that all weapons are inherently evil and have no place in civilized society. (How else to explain a student being suspended for wearing a five-inch plastic axe to school as part of a Halloween costume, or any of the numerous other examples of zero-tolerance insanity?) And that mindset seems to be taking hold, as evidenced by the phenomenon that Justice Scalia noted.

When I was twelve or so, Dad dropped me off to hunt woodchucks (groundhogs or whistle pigs, to some of you) along an abandoned railroad line a few miles from town. I had a Remington Model 660 chambered for .222 Remington and topped with a Leupold scope, and ten or twenty rounds of ammunition. I was supposed to hunt up the line to a given spot, and meet Dad there at a specified time. But we didn't communicate very well (a problem with counting rules) and ended up missing each other at the meeting point. When Dad still hadn't shown up twenty minutes after the appointed time, I knew something was wrong. So I went to the nearest farmhouse, unloaded my rifle, leaned it against a big maple tree in the yard, knocked on the front door, and asked to use the telephone. Dad wasn't home, of course -- he was looking for me -- so the farmer gave me and my rifle -- and one very dead woodchuck -- a ride home.

I really wonder how that situation would turn out today. I was a big twelve year-old but it still must've been evident to anyone who saw me up close that I was just a kid, and the rifle -- some idiot would surely call it a "sniper rifle" today -- was impossible to miss. Although it's been a long time since I lived there, I'm pretty sure that even in my hometown things have changed.
2.27.2006 3:59pm
Anonymou s Cow:
One thing I think is the government has not and does not want to do what needs to be done to protect the innocent aganist the criminal so the innocents rights and culture is corrupted.



When you can't catch criminals, make criminals out of the ones you can catch.
2.27.2006 4:06pm
Clayton E. Cramer (mail) (www):
DHBerger writes:


But in cities, lax gun laws are an invitation to urban areas' many criminals, and the proliferation of guns on the streets, even among responsible citizens, creates more deadly situations than it prevents. Furthermore, city streets are already heavily patrolled by armed cops who provide safety and firepower against criminals. So while I tend to think that having a gun in one's home for protection should be allowed, concealed weapons on the subway or in other public places should be illegal.
Please explain to me, then, why Boise (with a population approaching 200,000 now) has a murder rate that averages less than 1 per 100,000 people per year. It isn't gun control. At least 5% of the population has a concealed carry permit; open carry is not only lawful in cities, but Idaho's Supreme Court has ruled that it is protected by both the Second Amendment and Idaho Const., art. I, sec. 11; there is no state level machine gun regulation (just get the relatively lax federal paperwork, and that's enough); concealed carry outside of cities is lawful without a permit.

Now, I know that there are a lot of cities with serious violent crime problems, and Boise is the exception. But if you have examples like Boise that have relatively little violent crime AND very lax gun laws, it suggests that big cities can co-exist with lax gun laws. There is something else that is at the heart of the problem.
2.27.2006 4:31pm
John Lederer (mail):
I have brandished a firearm three times in my not too exceptional life, either to defend myself, or to defend someone else. Two cases were urban. One was rural.
2.27.2006 4:57pm
Mark McGilvray (mail):
In the mid '60s I used to take a Greyhound bus to my grandparents place about an hour outside Sacramento, CA, with rifles and shotguns. They were not in a case and sometimes a friend would bring his guns, too. No one ever said a thing, but to be sure they were unloaded. Today it would mean a meeting with SWAT.

Luckily. I have never had to pull a gun on anyone, although I have picked one up for the purpose on many occcasions. Once I broke down about two hours north of Reno, Nevada. I spent the night in the sagebrush in my sleeping bag with a 12 gauge. A Nevada cop came by to see what the story was, and I told him my alternator was having problems and that I would get a jump from someone in the morning. Late that night two guys drove by and then came back with their lights off. As they walked up to my pickup, I very noisily ejected a shell and chambered another. They left muy pronto. I didn't aim at them or say a word. It was pretty funny later, but not at the time.
2.27.2006 5:47pm
Plainsman (mail):
[In Idaho] there is no state level machine gun regulation (just get the relatively lax federal paperwork, and that's enough)

Now let's not get carried away here. I agree Idaho has exemplary gun laws, but the federal paperwork required for citizens to own MGs is the polar opposite of "relatively lax".

Not to mention that a transferable full-auto will run you from $3000 (budget MAC 10) to $15000+ (Tommy Guns, H&Ks) these days.
2.27.2006 7:03pm
Roscoe (mail) (www):
I remember about 30 years ago, when I was working on the old D&H Railroad line in upstate New York (and what I was doing there is a whole other story). I was part of a railroad tie replacement gang, which operated with heavy equipment on an active mainline (i.e. every now and again the railroad wanted to run a train on it).

Anyway, on the first day of deer season, just about every member of the gang brought some form of artillery to the job. And, at one point somebody reported seeing a deer. About three quarters of the gang grabbed their guns and ran off into the woods, leaving all the equipment sitting on the mainline. They returned about an hour later, sans deer.

Somehow, I doubt it works like that today.
2.27.2006 8:23pm
therut:
BC ie before Clinton at the age of 18 I carried a handgun with me at college. Even kept it is my dorm room. No laws or nannies in higher education at that time aganist it. I have never had to pull my handgun on anyone. I did once run at of gas at 3 am and with my cheerleading suit on walk about a mile on the highway to a trailor house and ask to use the phone. I layed my handgun on their deck. Now in the AC era if I was 18 and in that situation and needed the handgun to save my life I guess I would be one dead cheerleader and Nacy Grace the gun banner would be whinning over my death. One she would help to cause. Shameful. One needs a hangun in a city more than the rural areas. I disagree that gun control in cities is needed. I think the people in charge should want the law abiding to carry. Crime would go down. Lives would be saved. The police can not save your life at all times. It takes 4 minutes for brain damage from choking 6 minutes and you are dead. Good Luck.
2.27.2006 8:33pm
therut:
Just to note. My niece turned 21 last month. She now has a handgun and carry permit given by someone who thinks her life is important. And she is not afraid to use it. Last thing I want is her to have to beg for her life without any chance to fight for her right to life.
2.27.2006 8:35pm
Dave Hardy (mail) (www):
I;ve mentioned this story befor4 on the VC. In 1969 on a commercial flight from LAX to Houston for a poverty law conference, I met Don B. kates, who was instrumentql in opening the second amendment debate. Don had been a civil rights lawyer in the South, and he said he never went anywhere without a gun. Right there on the flight, he pulled a case out of his briefcase containing two handguns and expplained that he always carried them that way on commrcial flights to avoid possible trouble.

I see Don hasn't changed over the past decades. A few months ago Bob Cottrol and I were going to dinner, debating going into DC, and ran into Don. Bob was concerned he might be packing and asked, in his customary way "Don ... are you at this moment exercising the full panoply of your constitutional rights?" Don considered the question for a moment, and answered "no." Bob then suggested that we dine in DC.
2.27.2006 10:14pm
therut:
Mr. Hardy----that is funny.
2.27.2006 10:33pm
eb:
I was in Switzerland in 1996.I took the train from Zurich to Lausanne. Every young male on that train had an automatic rifle either with him or in the overhead compartment(maybe they were coming from or going to some military meeting).

I felt very safe in Switzerland(safer than in some parts of Boston,where I'm from, which has very strict gun control laws)
2.27.2006 10:34pm
Palladian:

"I grew up at a time when people were not afraid of people with firearms," said Scalia,


I think it's always a good idea to be afraid of a person with a firearm, especially if they are pointing it at you.

New York must have really been tough back then!
2.27.2006 11:48pm
Visitor Again:
I, too, carry a pocketknife. But California law limits spoirting knives to a ridiculous length. I think it's three and a half or four and a half inches. I'm reminded of a story in one of the Just William books, which I read as a boy in England. William received a pocket knife at Christmas from an aunt and uncle, who explained to his parents it was a knife he really couldn't do any damage with. William was disgusted. What good was a knife you couldn't do any damage with? Amen.

As I think about it, Don Kates told me he always carried two handguns, the second as a backup. If he went to D.C. without arms, he must be getting sloppy. By the way, he wa a very courageous civil rights lawyer and the target of assassination threats in the South. There may even have been an assassination effort; I just don't remember the details. Therefore he carried guns. He also carried around for distribution copies of a monograph he'd done on the right to bear arms; we all got one from him.
2.28.2006 1:12am
therut:
Well I have to admit that I found and read this blog because Kopel and Volokh first caught my eye back in 1999 when I got internet connections. I was just fooling around and googled firearms. I then heard about the Emerson case. I had never read a court case in my life. I did that one and it changed my life. I think I have read every court case on the Federal level and USSC regarding the second Amendment. Many law review articles and everthing written by the two mentioned above concerning firearms. If I was to stack the printed paper in a pile it would probaby be about 7-8 feet high. I was on a mission. I wanted to know if what my memory was telling me when I read Emerson with much consternation was right. I wanted to know if what I had been told my whole life and taught in Civics Class in Junior High School was a lie. I found out it was not. I was willing to accept I was mistaken but to my joy I found out my memory was pretty good. An activist was born. I admit life was much easier before politics entered but that is true of all knowledge. It complicates things.
2.28.2006 1:59am
Eugene Volokh (www):
Palladian: You should avoid going to shooting ranges, or for that matter to Olympic events, since then you'd have to be quaking in your boots. I'm with you on the "pointing it at you" matter, but if they're minding their own business with the gun, and you have no reason to believe they have criminal intentions, I don't see why you should be afraid of them.

And don't say that you're always afraid of people with deadly weapons, no matter what their intentions, unless you're constantly scared silly whenever you're on the road. You should be watchful and careful on the road or at a shooting range, but not afraid.
2.28.2006 2:30am
Eugene Volokh (www):
Justin: Is your snark a well-founded snark, even accounting for the obvious sarcasm? Do you have reason to think that Justice Scalia would deliberately interpret the Second Amendment based even in part on his experiences carrying rifles on the subway, as opposed to based on his understanding of original meaning, of tradition, or of the other sources that he believes are legitimate tools for interpreting constitutional text?
2.28.2006 2:43am
Ron Hardin (mail) (www):
My high school had a rifle range, and a rifle team, and competed with other high schools. Often kids on the school bus carried rifles going to or from home, and nobody remarked on it. 1959, Hillside NJ.
2.28.2006 3:12am
karrde (mail) (www):
An acquaintance of mine (who attended high school in a rural town in Northern Michigan within the past decade) told stories of being able to openly carry an unloaded shotgun on the school bus.

The school had a class that involved marksmanship with 0.22 rifles and shotguns.

Later on, some "gun free school zone" law ended that practice.
2.28.2006 10:05am
Andy Freeman (mail):
> I think it's always a good idea to be afraid of a person with a firearm, especially if they are pointing it at you.

Are you scared of big people? How about groups? How about police? How about people with cars? (If you want to kill someone, or several someones, run them over.)
2.28.2006 10:22am
J.Maestro (www):
One more thing to remember about Scalia's subway experience — he would most likely have been wearing a JROTC military uniform. (Hmm, not sure if that would make him more or less threatening to today's liberal sensitivities?)

And the rifle would have been in a case. They still had marksmanship training when I went to that school in the early 80s — we fired .22's in a basement rifle range under the direction of retired military faculty. Some students had their own competition rifles which they would take to/from school, usually by subway.

Obviously, safety training was a huge component of the program. Those who didn't participate... they never learned the safety rules. And they tend to be the ones horrified that such a program could ever exist.
2.28.2006 4:43pm
Palladian:
Eugene, it's ok, I'm pro gun rights and grew up in gun owning households. I just couldn't resist the obvious joke.
2.28.2006 11:29pm